Ryokan

Whenever I come to Japan I stay at a traditional Ryokan. For anyone who has ever doubted the power of Feng shui, just stay a night in one of these places. The traditional tatame mats, beautiful proportions, simple yet elegant arrangement of the furniture and bedding, quiet artwork upon the wall and lovely natural muted color palette all conspire to create an extraordinarily tranquil experience.

And every morning, in a private room with traditional Japanese music softly playing, they serve me a feast of six dishes, accompanied by fresh steamed rice and green tea brewed at the table. Everything is arranged upon the table just so — soups made with three kinds of mushroom, all varieties of tofu, fresh greens and spinach, sour plum and miso, sliced apples, carrot tempura, exotic sprouts, natto, seaweed salad, all sorts of dipping sauces, delicate spices and, on occasion, just a touch of fiery wasabe. Every breakfast is different, and each one is perfection.

When I go back home, I wish I could take the Ryokan with me.

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